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There is a right way to do things and a wrong way, if you’re going to run a hotel in a smugglers’ town. 

A rambling old inn, a strange map, an attic packed with treasures, squabbling guests, theft, friendship, and an unusual haunting mark this smart middle grade mystery in the tradition of the Mysterious Benedict Society books and Blue Balliet’s Chasing Vermeer series.”


Greenglass House was a quirky and rather amusing middle grade mystery; it was a light read that definitely hit the spot. Although it started better than it finished, I ultimately enjoyed it. The Boneshaker is a much better book though.


The main character of Greenglass House is a Milo, a boy of about twelve who lives in a beautiful old house at the top of a hill, and not just any house. It’s a smuggler’s inn, and was originally owned by the famous smuggler of all. One December, normally a quiet season, a group of varied guests converges on the house, each with their own mysterious reasons for being there. Milo and Meddy, the cook’s daughter (or so he believes) must figure out what exactly is going on, and whether anyone’s there for nefarious purposes (hint: they are). 


Many of the characters are developed quite well, but really the only thing described is the purpose of their traveling to Greenglass House. A lot about each guest’s backstory was left untold. The omission of one character’s development also made it pretty obvious who the bad guy was as well. Nevertheless, I think younger readers will be engaged by the book, and I was certainly charmed, especially by the whole motif of storytelling woven throughout the book. 

One of my complaints in recent times with middle grade fiction is that everything feels forced and simplistic. By contrast, Greenglass House flowed quite smoothly, and if some elements of the mystery weren’t tied together enough, it still made for an exciting read. It’s also pretty much one of those smart middle grade books, featuring an intelligent protagonist and an interesting plot.


The book’s tone is really charming and old time; the setting and the some elements of the plot are quite quaint. It’s also set right before Christmastime and to me it seemed as if the warmth of the holidays came across well on the page. At first, Milo is annoyed that his holiday has been disrupted, but he gradually starts to enjoy himself and realizes that in the end he’s gotten a lot more than just physical gifts from the season. All of this makes the book’s August 2014 release rather puzzling; to me, Greenglass House is best read around Christmas (if, unlike me, you celebrate it), and certainly as a warming winter read. The book’s just really…cozy. And yet somewhat thrilling at the same time.


The Boneshaker remains my favorite middle grade novel by Kate Milford, but Greenglass House has some of the familiar quirkiness and eccentricity of all of her books. It was just as good as The Broken Lands, if not a little better. I wasn’t wild about it,, but Greenglass House is a fun one. I received an ARC of the book from Harcourt; it doesn’t release until August.


373 pages (in the ARC).


Rating: ****

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